Weetamoo: Heart of the Pocassets by Patricia Clark Smith

Weetamoo: Heart of the Pocassets by Patricia Clark Smith

Weetamoo: Heart of the Pocassets

by Patricia Clark Smith

The Mother Daughter Book Club meeting for this book was held November 16, 2017, at 6:30 in the Community Room.

Book club reading copies were available for checkout from the circulation desk about a month prior to the meeting.

It is 1654 in New England, native land of Algonquin tribes, among them the Pocasset, Wampanoag, and Narrangansett people. The pilgrims have settled here in the natives’ territory at Patuxit, a place the Pilgrims renamed Plymouth. Weetamoo’s father, Corbitant, is chief of the Pocassets. He is mistrustful of the colonists and imparts his beliefs about them to his daughter, who is next in line to become chief. Weetamoo must learn the fundamental values and disciplines of a true Pocasset chief.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

by J.K. Rowling

A combined Mother Daughter Book Club and Books for Boys meeting for this book was held October 12, 2017, at 6:30 in the Community Room.

Book club reading copies were available for checkout from the circulation desk about a month prior to the meeting.

Harry Potter has no idea how famous he is because he’s being raised by his miserable aunt and uncle who are terrified Harry will learn that he’s a wizard, just as his parents were. But everything changes when Harry is summoned to Hogwarts, a school for wizards, and he begins to discover some curious clues. As he is greeted by a lovable giant, introduced to the unique curriculum and colorful teachers, Harry finds himself drawn deep inside a mystical world he never knew existed and closer to his own noble destiny.

book 1 in the Harry Potter series

Ratings and Reviews from the Librarians

Vivian rated it ★★★★ and said “When I first read this (14 years ago!) it was the first book I’d actually enjoyed for a long while…. The thing about Harry Potter was that he too had plenty of problems but they were presented in such a fantastic way that plowing through them with him was engaging to the reader. The author was able to side-step what I call “the Emperor’s New Clothes” syndrome and actually address topics silenced by “p.c.” (Political Correctness) by dressing them up in new attire.

Many adults object to children being okay with “witches” and such, but taking that path opened up so many other paths for the writer (and reader) to explore.

Since my first reading I’ve read this and the subsequent titles aloud to my children several times. Each time we stop and talk about the character’s choices and the consequences of the choices (not in a didactic hammer sort of way, but simply as a puzzling-it-out way). The books have served as vehicles for sharing personal and family and cultural values.

Of course we read aloud from other books, including scriptures, as a family. Just as my children (now grown) never had any trouble confusing ‘Santa’ or ‘Halloween’ or ‘Easter Bunny’ with their Christian faith and beliefs, neither did Harry Potter or any of the other ‘fantasy’ genre we have enjoyed reading detract from their core religious beliefs. Somehow, for us, it is all part of the tapestry of our lives.”

Valerie rated it ★★★★★

Katra rated it ★★★★★

Bekka rated it ★★★★★

Courtney rated it ★★★★

The Strange Case of Origami Yoda by Tom Angleberger

The Strange Case of Origami Yoda by Tom Angleberger

The Strange Case of Origami Yoda

by Tom Angleberger

A combined Mother Daughter Book Club and Books for Boys meeting for this book was held on May 11, 2017, at 6:30 in the Community Room.

Book club reading copies were available for checkout from the circulation desk about a month prior to the meeting.

IT TAKES THE WISDOM OF YODA TO SURVIVED THE SIXTH GRADE

Meet Dwight, a sixth-grade oddball. Dwight does a lot of weird things, like wearing the same T-shirt for a month or telling people to call him “Captain Dwight.” This is embarrassing, particularly for Tommy, who sits with him at lunch every day.

But Dwight does one cool thing. He makes origami. One day he makes an origami finger puppet of Yoda. And that’s when things get mysterious. Origami Yoda can predict the future and suggest the best way to deal with a tricky situation. His advice actually works, and soon most of the sixth grade is lining up with questions.

Tommy wants to know how Origami Yoda can be so smart when Dwight himself is so clueless. Is Yoda tapping into the Force? It’s crucial that Tommy figure out the mystery before he takes Yoda’s advice about something VERY IMPORTANT that has to do with a girl.

This is Tommy’s case file of his investigation into “The Strange Case of Origami Yoda.”

book 1 in the Origami Yoda series

Ratings and Reviews from the Librarians

Johnathan rated it ★★★★ and said “I liked this book a lot. I thought it was going to be a weird telling of Star Wars with paper but it is about kids trying to navigate life. It was funny, the characters talked like kids (I hate when the kids just sound like small adults), and the plot fun. I definitely want to read the series to see how it progresses.”

Katra rated it ★★★★

Ida B. . . and Her Plans to Maximize Fun, Avoid Disaster, and (Possibly) Save the World by Katherine Hannigan

Ida B. . . and Her Plans to Maximize Fun, Avoid Disaster, and (Possibly) Save the World by Katherine Hannigan

Ida B. . . and Her Plans to Maximize Fun, Avoid Disaster, and (Possibly) Save the World

by Katherine Hannigan
Ida B. . . and Her Plans to Maximize Fun, Avoid Disaster, and (Possibly) Save the World by Katherine Hannigan

The Mother Daughter Book Club meeting for this book was held April 13, 2017, at 6:30 in the Community Room.

Book club reading copies were available for checkout from the circulation desk about a month prior to the meeting.

Ida B. Applewood believes there is never enough time for fun.

That’s why she’s so happy to be homeschooled and to spend every free second outside with the trees and the brook.

Then some not-so-great things happen in her world. Ida B has to go back to that Place of Slow but Sure Body-Cramping, Mind-Numbing, Fun-Killing Torture—school. She feels her heart getting smaller and smaller and hardening into a sharp, black stone.

How can things go from righter than right to a million miles beyond wrong? Can Ida B put together a plan to get things back to just-about perfect again?

Ratings and Reviews from the Librarians

Katra rated it ★★★★★ and said “I really felt for Ida B., for her loves, her relationships, her woes, and her triumphs. This is a child’s book with true depth. I loved it!”

Lorna rated it ★★★★★.

Dragon Slippers by Jessica Day George

Dragon Slippers by Jessica Day George

Dragon Slippers

by Jessica Day George

The Mother Daughter Book Club meeting for this book was held March 9, 2017, at 6:30 in the Community Room.

Book club reading copies were available for checkout from the circulation desk about a month prior to the meeting.

Creel, the heroine of Dragon Slippers is hardly a damsel-in-distress. After her aunt totes her out to the local dragon in desperation (with the hope that the local prince will rescue her from certain death and marry her), Creel refuses the haughty prince and finds friendship with the dragons, who set her on a journey to the center of the kingdom with a pretty pair of what only seem to be ordinary slippers. Along the way we discover Creel’s enormous talent at embroidery, and you can’t help but linger over the rich descriptions of her lovely tapestry-like gowns, which quickly make her the most sought-after dressmaker in the kingdom. But soon enough those mysterious slippers begin to wreak havoc, and it’s up to Creel to save the kingdom from disaster and defend the dragons from certain doom. Creel’s feisty spirit breathes fiery new life into this epic world at every turn, making this one of the most memorable and fun fantasy debuts to hit shelves since Cornelia Funke’s Inkheart.

book 1 in the Dragon Slippers series

Ratings and Reviews from the Librarians

Lorna rated it ★★★★ and said “Good fun. Light, easy reading with warm humor. I was impressed with the plot also.”

Patty rated it ★★★★ and said “Well written and good story. My daughter will like it I am sure. My older daughter has read it and really liked it.”

Miranda rated it ★★★★.

Rump: The True Story of Rumplestiltskin by Liesl Shurtliff

Rump: The True Story of Rumplestiltskin by Liesl Shurtliff

Rump: The True Story of Rumplestiltskin

by Liesl Shurtliff

The Books for Boys Book Club meeting for this book was held January 19, 2017, at 6:30 in the Community Room.

The Mother Daughter Book Club meeting for this book was held February 2, 2017, at 6:30 in the Community Room.

Book club reading copies were available for checkout from the circulation desk about a month prior to the meeting.

In a magic kingdom where your name is your destiny, 12-year-old Rump is the butt of everyone’s joke. But when he finds an old spinning wheel, his luck seems to change. Rump discovers he has a gift for spinning straw into gold. His best friend, Red Riding Hood, warns him that magic is dangerous, and she’s right. With each thread he spins, he weaves himself deeper into a curse.

To break the spell, Rump must go on a perilous quest, fighting off pixies, trolls, poison apples, and a wickedly foolish queen. The odds are against him, but with courage and friendship—and a cheeky sense of humor—he just might triumph in the end.

Ratings and Reviews from the Librarians

Patty rated it ★★★★.

Where the Mountain Meets the Moon by Grace Lin

Where the Mountain Meets the Moon by Grace Lin

Where the Mountain Meets the Moon

by Grace Lin

The Mother Daughter Book Club meeting for this book was held January 12, 2017, at 6:30 in the Community Room.

Book club reading copies were available for checkout from the circulation desk about a month prior to the meeting.

In the Valley of Fruitless Mountain, a young girl named Minli spends her days working hard in the fields and her nights listening to her father spin fantastic tales about the Jade Dragon and the Old Man of the Moon. Minli’s mother, tired of their poor life, chides him for filling her head with nonsense. But Minli believes these enchanting stories and embarks on an extraordinary journey to find the Old Man of the Moon and ask him how her family can change their fortune. She encounters an assorted cast of characters and magical creatures along the way, including a dragon who accompanies her on her quest.

Newbery Honor book for 2010

Ratings and Reviews from the Librarians

Vivian rated it ★★★★ and said “Here is The Wizard of Oz with an Asian flavor.
Like Dorothy in Kansas, Minli’s village is gray and dreary with nothing but want and drudgery for her parents and herself. Her father tells stories to relieve the weariness. Her mother objects to the stories, fearing that Minli will believe them.
Like Dorothy, Minli sets out on a journey, meets remarkable friends, meets terrible obstacles and fierce opponents, and makes difficult choices.
This story is charming, heart-warming, and entertaining. Many chapters contain stories and alternating chapters tell of Minli’s parents while she is gone. I think this is one of the strongest features of the book. Children’s choices and actions affect others and especially those who love them most.
Anyone who likes THE WIZARD OF OZ will love this story.”

Lorna rated it ★★★★ and said “Fantasy crossed with Chinese folklore. Beautiful illustrations. Stories within the story dragged on a bit, but overall very nice with a good message.”

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

by C.S. Lewis

A combined Mother Daughter Book Club and Books for Boys meeting for this book was held December 8, 2016 at 6:30 in the Community Room.

Book club reading copies were available for checkout from the circulation desk about a month prior to the meeting.

‘They say Aslan is on the move. Perhaps he has already landed,’ whispered the Beaver. Edmund felt a sensation of mysterious horror. Peter felt brave and adventurous. Susan felt as if some delightful strain of music had just floated by. And Lucy got that feeling when you realize it’s the beginning of summer. So, deep in the bewitched land of Narnia, the adventure begins.

They opened a door and entered a world–Narnia–the land beyond the wardrobe, the secret country known only to Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy. Lucy is the first to stumble through the back of the enormous wardrobe in the professor’s mysterious old country house, discovering the magic world beyond. At first, no one believes her. But soon Edmund, Peter and Susan, too, discover the magic and meet Aslan, the Great Lion, for themselves. And in the blink of an eye, they are changed forever.

book 2 in the Chronicles of Narnia series

Ratings and Reviews from the Librarians

Bekka rated it ★★★★★ and said,”The one that started it all! For the rest of my childhood, I looked for magic doors and closets I could walk through. It made me want to live in Narnia.”

Vivian rated it ★★★.

Lorna rated it ★★★★★.

The BFG by Roald Dahl

The BFG by Roald Dahl

The BFG

by Roald Dahl

The Mother Daughter Book Club meeting for this book was held November 10, 2016, at 6:30 in the Community Room.

The Books for Boys Book Club meeting for this book was held February 16, 2017, at 6:30 in the Community Room.

Book club reading copies were available for checkout from the circulation desk about a month prior to the meeting.

Captured by a giant! The BFG is no ordinary bone-crunching giant. He is far too nice and jumbly. It’s lucky for Sophie that he is. Had she been carried off in the middle of the night by the Bloodbottler, the Fleshlumpeater, the Bonecruncher, or any of the other giants-rather than the BFG-she would have soon become breakfast.

When Sophie hears that they are flush-bunking off in England to swollomp a few nice little chiddlers, she decides she must stop them once and for all. And the BFG is going to help her!

Ratings and Reviews from the Librarians

Bekka rated it ★★★★ and said “A little on the silly side, but in a great way! Very enjoyable. A great book for kids and grown-ups to read together.”

Lorna rated it ★★★★ and said “One has to admire this imagination. I especially enjoyed the made-up words.”

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