Artemis by Andy Weir – Suspense in Space

Artemis by Andy Weir – Suspense in Space

Artemis by Andy Weir – Suspense in Space

It’s really impossible not to make comparisons between Andy Weir’s new novel, Artemis, and his prior blockbuster, The Martian. The protagonist here lacks the hero quality of The Martian‘s Watney but possesses his brilliance and humor.

Jazz is the genius that could have done anything, but refused. Instead of an extreme tale of survival, there’s an extreme caper gone horribly awry. The plot is even more tightly crafted and accelerates to a breakneck speed. Weir appears to be creating a whole new fiction genre, the believable and scientifically sound sci-fi thriller. It wasn’t a genre I was aware that we needed; but having had a two tastes, I now need more.

“Illuminae” by Aimee Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

“Illuminae” by Aimee Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

“Illuminae” by Aimee Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

Written through IM, email, and classified reports, this book tells the story of Kady and her fight to save her ship (and maybe her very recently ex-boyfriend, if she can swing it). When her mining outpost is attacked by a competitor, only a few thousand people make it to the three ships fleeing for safety. Those ships head for the nearest location with a transport portal, more than six months away. They are stalked by the enemy, a well armed attack vessel. Throw in a twist with a rogue AI and a killer virus, and this makes for one great story.

When you read a 600 pg book in 1 day, you know it was good! I loved These Broken Stars, and this has that same feel to it. The uniqueness comes in the style it was written in, including the wonderful pages with the ships flying through space. It also includes schematics of the ship and the distance the characters have to travel in order to make it out alive. All of this works together along with the text itself to create a great visual story. If you enjoy this one, book two, Gemina, is also available (and just as fantastic). Book three should be available late 2017.

Professional reviews:

 “Hints of romance and references to Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey interweave with the text, itself an arresting visual experience that weds form with expression and content.”
–Booklist, starred review

 

“Steelheart” by Brandon Sanderson

“Steelheart” by Brandon Sanderson

“Steelheart” by Brandon Sanderson

steelheartThis is my very first sci-fi read and it went surprisingly well. I have always placed sci-fi on this horrible top shelf in the back of my mind where I know I will never bother looking. Thankfully, my husband has great taste in books and insisted I read this book (or anything by Brandon Sanderson, really). I started this book three times before actually committing to it, mostly because I was sure I wouldn’t find it interesting. However, Brandon Sanderson wastes no time in introducing the world of Newcago to the reader. Once I really gave it a chance, I was hooked.

After a quick preface, you get right into the action. The book follows orphaned teenager David who yearns to join a rebel group known as the Reckoners and aid in their efforts to end the Epics rule in Newcago. The constant action and forward pace of the book don’t disappoint and, to my surprise, left me wondering why I had waited so long to read this book. Steelheart caught my attention with humorous characters, unexpected twists, and a “leave-you-wanting-more” cliffhanger.

If you love sci-fi, read this book. If you don’t love sci-fi, read it anyway; it will change your mind.

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