Toddler Time and Book Babies – June 15 and 17, 2020

by | Jun 17, 2020 | Baby Time, Blog, Kid's Corner | 0 comments

Toddler Time and Book Babies – June 15 and 17, 2020

Toddler Time for ages 10 to 23 months – 9:45 am Mondays (June 15)

Book Babies for ages 0 to 9 months – 9:45 am Wednesdays (June 17)

 

Summer Reading 2020 is here! We are going to “Imagine Your Story” this year. So, find your imagination. sprinkle magic dust, and you will find… Dragons! Madison Library District is open. Come on in and check out some of these books when you sign up for Summer Reading.

Welcome Songs

Here We Are Together

Here we are together, together, together!
Oh, here we are together in our library.
There’s (sing names)
Here we are together in our library!

Hello Everybody

Hello everybody let’s clap our hands*,
clap our hands,
clap our hands.
Hello everybody let’s clap our hands today!

*pat our head, stretch up high, wiggle our fingers, tickle our knees, kick our feet, bounce up high!

S, T, R, W, P

(Sing while pointing to each finger on your child’s hand.)

Sing, talk, read, write, play!
Sing, talk, read write, play!
Sing, talk, read, write, play!
Sing, talk, read, write, play each day!

Books Presented

The Oh So Brave Dragon
by David Kirk

Dragon knows he is supposed to be brave and is ready to try out his fearsome roar, but when he hears something that scares him, he turns to his forest friends for help in finding the noise and renewing his courage.

Find it in our Catalog

Dragons Are Real!
by Holly Hatam

This Mythical Creatures Are Real! board book offers babies and toddlers a glimpse into the colorful, whimsical world of dragons. Discover what makes them so magical! Moonlight and courage and sparks, oh my! That’s what dragons are made of.

Find it in our Catalog

That’s Not My Dragon
by Fiona Watt

A toddler searches for a specific dragon in this book in the groundbreaking “That’s not my…” series. It combines bright, colorful illustrations with a variety of different textures to touch and feel.

Find it in our Catalog

Little Dragon and the New Baby
by Deborah Cuneo

Can Little Dragon ever get used to the idea of being a big brother?

Find it in our Catalog

Good Night, Little Dragons
by Leigh Ann Tyson

What do little dragons do before going to bed? They brush their fangs, take a bath, and breathe fire, of course!

Find it in our Catalog

Hush, Little Dragon
by Boni Ashburn

Adorable dragons search for a bedtime snack in this picture book set to the tune of “Hush, Little Baby.” Baby and Mama dragon are almost ready to settle in for the night. But Baby can’t sleep until he gets a treat, so together they search for one in a beautifully detailed village. But there are so many options to choose from!

Find it in our Catalog

Scarf Songs and Bouncing Rhymes

Dragon in the Cave

There’s a dragon in the cave
Sitting so still.
Will he come out?
Yes, he will!

Here’s a dragon in my hand,
Sitting so still.
Will he blow fire?
Yes, he will!

– Traditional w/ adjustments

Swing Your Dragon Tail

Turn around once and swing your dragon tail.
Turn around twice and flap your wings like sails.
Turn around three times, stomp your feet and roar.
Jump up high and then sit down on the floor.

– Jacksonville Public Library

Dragon Pokey

(version of Hokey Pokey)

You put your right claw in,
You put your right claw out,
You put your right claw in,
And you shake it all about,
You do the dragon pokey
and you turn yourself around
That what it’s all about.

… left claw
…tail
… dragon self

– Jacksonville Public Library

Breathing Fire

(tune: London Bridges)

Little Dragon, breathing fire
Breathing fire, breathing fire
Little dragon breathing fire
Little dragon!

…toward the ground
…on your head!
…on your nose
….in the sky!

– Jacksonville Public Library

The Grand Old Duke of York

The Grand Old Duke of York
The Grand Old Duke of York
He had ten thousand men.
He marched them up to the top of the hill
And marched them down again!

And when they’re up, they’re up.
And when they’re down, they’re down.
And when they’re only half-way up,
They’re neither up nor down!

He marched them to the left
He marched them to the right.
He marched them to the top of the hill
And marched them out of sight.

– Traditional

Craft Activity

Fire Breathing Dragon Tube

This fire breathing dragon made from a toilet paper roll is an easy kids craft that uses simple craft supplies. When you blow into the end of the tube the tissue paper looks like flames coming out of the dragon’s mouth. You can also use this dragon tube with a scarf instead of the tissue paper. Let your toddler “pull” the fire from the dragon’s mouth!

“Dragon” Search Oatmeal Sensory Bin

Sensory play builds nerve connections in the brain’s pathways, which lead to the child’s ability to complete more complex learning tasks. Try filling a large pan or bowl with oatmeal and “hiding” small dragons (dinosaurs) in their caves. Encourage your toddler to find the dragons with their hands, or using a spoon and cup.

Domesticfashionista.com

Signing Songs

“Sleep”

(tune “The Farmer in Dell)
We ask to go to SLEEP,
we ask to go to SLEEP.
(Open hand at top of head, pull down and bring fingers together)
When it’s time to go to bed,
we ask to go to SLEEP.

“Bed”

(tune “The Farmer in Dell)
We ask for BED like this,
we ask for BED like this.
(Lay head on back of hands and lean to side)
When we’re tired and want a nap,
we ask for BED like this.

Early Literacy Tip and Activity:

Tip

It takes longer for children who are just learning to talk to respond to our questions. This happens because four different parts of the brain have to work together for your child to form a response to what you say. We need to be patient and wait anywhere from 5 to 12 seconds for children to respond. That feels like a long time because adults usually respond in about 2 seconds. The extra time you give children allows them the practice they need to respond more quickly over time.

Lambert

“Read and Describe” Activity

Read aloud a book that has large, colorful illustrations and a very short text. after reading the book, turn to a page and point to an item in a picture. Ask, “What’s this?’ Wait for your child to respond and talk about what is happening in the picture.

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